Richard Neal

(Richard Edmund Neal)

Richard Neal
Richard Neal
  • Born: February 14, 1949
  • Nationality: American
  • Profession: Teacher

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Richard Edmund Neal is an American politician and the U.S. Representative for Massachusetts's 1st congressional district. He is a member of the Democratic Party and a former city councilor and mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts. He is currently the dean of the Massachusetts delegation to the House of Representatives.

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But what is striking about this, in a town that often talks about tax cuts, we could quite easily, Republicans and Democrats working together, do something that everybody in America desires, and that is a simplification of our Tax Code.
Fundamentally, I believe that the U.S. can improve its international standing and its national security by expanding trade and strengthening its relationships with moderate Muslim countries.
Inherited wealth, that is not what America is based upon.
It is day after day in this institution, borrow money, run up the debt, run up the deficits and then with a straight face say, we are going to repeal a tax that affects 1 percent of the American people, just 1 percent of the American people. Money, Coins & Minting
It is easy to talk about tax simplification, and we all know it is very difficult to accomplish; but for the last three Congresses, I have offered a tax simplification bill that would include a paid-for repeal of alternative minimum tax.
Let me announce this to the American people tonight one of the best things about this debate, as a Democrat from Massachusetts, I have proposed eliminating, getting rid of the alternative minimum tax.
Let me say at the outset that I do not reflexively oppose international trade.
Many injuries and deaths can be prevented through an understanding of the dangers of power lines, electrical appliances, extension cords, and lightning. Power
More broadly, we are going to have to examine the safety net programs to make sure they are poised to catch the families before they fall even more, especially in the areas of unemployment benefits, child care assistance, and foster care.
Over the years, dozens of American companies have filed papers to trade in their U.S. corporate citizenship for citizenship in tax haven countries like Bermuda.
People really have to believe in their tax system. They have to believe that there is an equitable distribution of the burden, but there is also an important investment based upon the potential achievements that come from us paying our taxes.
President Bush is manufacturing a crisis by suggesting that Social Security is in imminent danger. It is not.
The ABA works tirelessly in its efforts involving the first line of defense: the prevention of burn injuries.
The alternative minimum tax was designed to prevent the very wealthiest Americans from overusing certain tax benefits to avoid most of their tax burden.
The number of electrical injuries cared for in hospitals in the US is estimated at as many as 50,000; the cost of these injuries on the US economy is estimated at over one billion dollars per year.
The slogan of the moderate Republican Party is this: we are rich, and we are not going to take it any more.
The Tax Code today is more complicated than ever, and the very people on the Republican side who denounce the Tax Code's complexity are the ones that put together what they now call a convoluted monstrosity. They put it into effect.
The tax relief that this Congress has given now in terms of four tax cuts has overwhelmingly gone to the people at the very top of the income scale in America.
Trade can really be good for American workers and American businesses.
Under the Bush plan, Social Security gets weaker, not stronger.
Unfortunately, more and more Muslim voices are calling for boycotts of the United States and its products.
We can preserve Social Security benefits for generations of Americans without privatizing this important program.
We should stop arguing about tax cuts in this town.
Well, when I was a kid, if my father was witnessing something that he thought was particularly outrageous or he was looking at some sort of a question that he thought lacked proper definition, he would say, Well, at least Jesse James had the honor to wear a mask.